Make notes…

Something I wish I had started doing as soon as I purchased my first plants and bulbs was to write them down.

As someone who is learning about plants as I go along, I have only now realised how valuable it is to make notes the whole time. I stupidly planted out bulbs last autumn and potted up plants – with no reference to the date I did so or even the types of bulbs or plants I buried in the soil. Rookie Mistake!

I now have shoots popping up in the flower beds, and I honestly couldn’t tell if they are weeds or not. Having no knowledge of what i’ve planted, I have no reference to check what to pull up and what to leave. I have veggies sown from seed and I cant remember the type I bought or when I should expect them to be ready… Bloody nightmare!

Last week however, I finally purchased a small note book (although you could keep your notes on a computer or tablet) and started listing the full names of seeds/bulbs/plants I have in my garden & allotment, date planted, in pots or direct in the ground, when they first showed shoots, when I topped up the compost & when they should be ready to harvest (veggies) or cut if decorative flowers. Literally everything I think might be useful.

My newly updated, cheap and cheerful (85p from the post office) notebook will give me a good place to start next year when it comes to growing again. I can see what worked and what didn’t, what to expect, tips I tried this year that improved the process… See – invaluable!

It doesn’t matter if you scribble it down in a book or type it up neatly, what order you write it or anything. So long as it’s coherent enough that it makes sense next time you read it, thats all that counts!

Super handy tip, from one novice gardener to another! You’re welcome!

Amy x

The Propagator

One of my Christmas presents last year was this little beauty!

Today, my ‘Garland Fab 4 Electric Propagator’ has had its first use. I have planted up two packets of Dahlia seeds. We have Dwarf Double Mixed and Pompon Mixed.  Which were super cheap from Wilko, as you can see! 

Once they have started to sprout in the Propagator, I will prick them out and keep them in a larger tray or pot until they are strong enough to brave the outside, probably around May. When I will keep them in their trays/pots in the garden for a couple of weeks before moving them to the allotment.

After working on Gardeners’ World last year, I was inspired to use some of the space at the allotment as a cut flower border. This way throughout the summer months, I can bring fresh flowers into the house which I have grown myself – rather than forking out for a bouquet in store.

Plus, what a thoughtful gift for friends and family, a bouquet of flowers from our own allotment!?

Keep an eye on my blog for updates on my newest gadget – and the little seeds I have planted in there!

You could get the same propagator as me from Garland Products – they also do larger versions if you have more seeds to plant than I do!

Amy x